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A case for global investment in the capabilities of adolescents

21 Apr, 2017 | 15:20h | UTC

Report: Building the foundations for sustainable development: a case for global investment in the capabilities of adolescents – The Lancet(free)

See also: Securing investments to realise the social and economic rights of adolescents (free) Our Future – Invest in Adolescent Health Now(free) AND Our future: a Lancet commission on adolescent health and wellbeing (all articles are free)

“Investing in adolescent health & education could bring 10-fold economic benefit” (RT @TheLancet see Tweet)

 


Physicians Split Time Evenly Between Seeing Patients And Desktop Medicine

21 Apr, 2017 | 15:18h | UTC

Electronic Health Record Logs Indicate That Physicians Split Time Evenly Between Seeing Patients And Desktop Medicine – Health Affairs (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Source: By the Numbers: Docs’ Logged-On Time Increases – MedPage Today (free registration required)

Related: Putting Patients First by Reducing Administrative Tasks in Health Care: A Position Paper of the American College of Physicians (free)

“Electronic health records systems now account for about half of the average doctor’s day”

 


Too many studies have hidden conflicts of interest. A new tool makes it easier to see them

21 Apr, 2017 | 15:17h | UTC

Too many studies have hidden conflicts of interest. A new tool makes it easier to see them – VOX (free)

“Great news: PubMed is finally publishing info about funding sources/conflicts of interest on its abstracts” (RT @paimadhu and @juliaoftorontosee Tweet)

 


Frequency of Evidence-Based Screening for Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes

21 Apr, 2017 | 15:22h | UTC

Frequency of Evidence-Based Screening for Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes – New England Journal of Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

See also: Researchers Propose Extending Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Interval – Physician’s First Watch (free) AND Research from long-term study advocates individualized eye screenings in type 1 diabetes – Diabetes.co.uk (free)

In patients who have had type 1 diabetes for 5 years, annual retinal examinations are currently recommended. Based on their findings, the authors suggest an individualized screening schedule, with less frequent screening for patients at low risk and more frequent screening for patients at higher risk, leading to decreased cost without delaying the diagnosis of clinically significant disease.

 


Fri, Apr 21 – Top 10 Medical News Stories!

21 Apr, 2017 | 00:27h | UTC

 

1 – Frequency of Evidence-Based Screening for Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes – New England Journal of Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

See also: Researchers Propose Extending Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Interval – Physician’s First Watch (free) AND Research from long-term study advocates individualized eye screenings in type 1 diabetes – Diabetes.co.uk (free)

In patients who have had type 1 diabetes for 5 years, annual retinal examinations are currently recommended. Based on their findings, the authors suggest an individualized screening schedule, with less frequent screening for patients at low risk and more frequent screening for patients at higher risk, leading to decreased cost without delaying the diagnosis of clinically significant disease.

 

2 – Report: Building the foundations for sustainable development: a case for global investment in the capabilities of adolescents – The Lancet (free)

See also: Securing investments to realise the social and economic rights of adolescents (free) Our Future – Invest in Adolescent Health Now (free) AND Our future: a Lancet commission on adolescent health and wellbeing (all articles are free)

“Investing in adolescent health & education could bring 10-fold economic benefit” (RT @TheLancet see Tweet)

 

3 – Beyond Medication Reconciliation: The Correct Medication List – JAMA (free) (RT @AnilMakam see Tweet)

Achieving a “correct medication list” involves multiple levels of medication reconciliation. This viewpoint describes the main steps for achieving this goal.

 

4 – Association between active commuting and incident cardiovascular disease, cancer, and mortality: prospective cohort study – The BMJ (free)

Editorial: Active commuting is beneficial for health (free)

See also: Cycling to work can cut cancer and heart disease, says study – BBC News (free) AND Cycling to work: major new study suggests health benefits are staggering – The Conversation (free)

 

5 – Electronic Health Record Logs Indicate That Physicians Split Time Evenly Between Seeing Patients And Desktop Medicine – Health Affairs (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Source: By the Numbers: Docs’ Logged-On Time Increases – MedPage Today (free registration required)

Related: Putting Patients First by Reducing Administrative Tasks in Health Care: A Position Paper of the American College of Physicians (free)

“Electronic health records systems now account for about half of the average doctor’s day”

 

6 – Why the Menace of Mosquitoes Will Only Get Worse – The New York Times Magazine (RT @CIDRAP  and @marynmck see Tweet) (10 articles per month are free)

Related: Disease Burden Growing as Vector Insects Adapt to Climate Change – IPS (free) (source Global Health NOW Newsletter) AND UN Doc: Climate Change is New Challenge in Fighting Disease Outbreaks – MedPage Today (free registration required)

“Climate change is altering the environment in ways that increase the potential for viruses like Zika”.

 

7 – The Lancet Countdown: Tracking Progress on Health and Climate Change – The Lancet (free)

Editorial: Climate and health: joining up the pieces, scaling up the action (free)

 

8 – Diabetes incidence and glucose intolerance prevalence increase with higher outdoor temperature – BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care (free)

Sources: Climate Change Linked to Rising Diabetes Prevalence: Study – MedPage Today (free registration required) AND Is there a link between climate change and diabetes? – CNN (free)

“Association between climate change and diabetes?” (RT @kamleshkhunti see Tweet)

 

9 – Medical Alert! Climate Change Is Harming Our Health – Medical Society Consortium on Climate & Health (link to summary – free PDF available)

Sources: Medical Societies Come Together on Harms of Climate Change – Medscape (free registration required) AND Climate Change Already Affecting Human Health – Physician’s First Watch (free)

 

10 – Too many studies have hidden conflicts of interest. A new tool makes it easier to see them – VOX (free)

“Great news: PubMed is finally publishing info about funding sources/conflicts of interest on its abstracts” (RT @paimadhu and @juliaoftoronto see Tweet)

 


Syncope and Its Impact on Occupational Accidents and Employment

20 Apr, 2017 | 14:29h | UTC

Syncope and Its Impact on Occupational Accidents and Employment: A Danish Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study – Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes (free)

News release: Fainting spells may increase risk of workplace accidents, job loss – American Heart Association News (free)

See also: 2017 ACC/AHA/HRS Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of Patients With Syncope (free PDF) AND First fainting guidelines issued to diagnose life-threatening heart conditions – American Heart Association News (free)

 


Use of Medications of Questionable Benefit at the End of Life

20 Apr, 2017 | 14:34h | UTC

Use of Medications of Questionable Benefit at the End of Life in Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia – Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

See also: Use of Medications of Questionable Benefit at the End of Life in Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia – CBCNews (free) AND Many With Advanced Dementia Receiving Drugs of Uncertain Benefit – Medscape (free registration required)

“Too much use of meds of questionable benefit at the end of life: Just Stop.” (RT @DeeMangin see Tweet)

 


Climate Change and Health Reports

21 Apr, 2017 | 14:37h | UTC

Why the Menace of Mosquitoes Will Only Get Worse – The New York Times Magazine (RT @CIDRAP  and @marynmck see Tweet) (10 articles per month are free)

Related: Disease Burden Growing as Vector Insects Adapt to Climate Change – IPS (free) (source Global Health NOW Newsletter) AND UN Doc: Climate Change is New Challenge in Fighting Disease Outbreaks – MedPage Today (free registration required)

“Climate change is altering the environment in ways that increase the potential for viruses like Zika”.

 

The Lancet Countdown: Tracking Progress on Health and Climate Change – The Lancet (free)

Editorial: Climate and health: joining up the pieces, scaling up the action (free)

 

Medical Alert! Climate Change Is Harming Our Health – Medical Society Consortium on Climate & Health (link to summary – free PDF available)

Sources: Medical Societies Come Together on Harms of Climate Change – Medscape (free registration required) AND Climate Change Already Affecting Human Health – Physician’s First Watch (free)

 


Approaches for Evaluation of Asymptomatic Microscopic Hematuria

20 Apr, 2017 | 14:27h | UTC

Cost-effectiveness of Common Diagnostic Approaches for Evaluation of Asymptomatic Microscopic Hematuria – JAMA Internal Medicine (free)

Invited commentary: Asymptomatic Microscopic Hematuria – Rethinking the Diagnostic Algorithm (free)

Routine urinalysis for screening is not presently recommended by any major health organization, but asymptomatic microscopic hematuria is a common incidental finding. This study suggests that the combination of renal ultrasound and cystoscopy is the most cost-effective approach for the evaluation of these patients.

 


Mortality Trends After Surgical Safety Checklist

20 Apr, 2017 | 14:31h | UTC

Mortality Trends After a Voluntary Checklist-based Surgical Safety Collaborative – Annals of Surgery (link to abstract – free PDF available)

Sources: Global Health NOW Newsletter (free) AND South Carolina Hospitals Saw Surgery Deaths Drop After Implementing WHO Checklist – AJMC News (free) AND A simple checklist prevents deaths after surgery, a large new study suggests – The Washington Post (a few articles per month are free)

See also: WHO Surgical Safety Checklist – World Health Organization (free) AND A Surgical Safety Checklist to Reduce Morbidity and Mortality in a Global Population – New England Journal of Medicine (free)

 


β-Blocker Exposure in Pregnancy and Risk of Fetal Cardiac Anomalies

20 Apr, 2017 | 14:28h | UTC

β-Blocker Exposure in Pregnancy and Risk of Fetal Cardiac Anomalies – JAMA Internal Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

See also: No Fetal Heart Risk from Mom’s Beta-Blocker Use – MedPage Today (free registration required)

 


Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases: low value interventions

20 Apr, 2017 | 14:30h | UTC

Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases: low value interventions – The Medical Journal of Australia (free) (RT @ChooseWiselyAU and @ASIDANZ see Tweet)

See also: Choosing Wisely initiative was launched 5 years ago in our April 5 issue.

The society has just released a selection of 5 low value interventions (details in the text):

 

– Prescribing antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria.

– Taking a swab of a leg ulcer without signs of clinical infection and treating the patient with antibiotics against the identified bacteria.

– Treating upper respiratory tract infections with antibiotics.

– Investigation for fecal pathogens in the absence of diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms.

– Ordering multiple serological investigations for patients with fatigue without a clinical indication or relevant epidemiology.

 


Why it’s a bad idea to space out your child’s vaccination shots

19 Apr, 2017 | 14:17h | UTC

Why it’s a bad idea to space out your child’s vaccination shots – The Washington Post (a few articles per month are free)

“Splitting immunizations into several visits only increases children’s stress” (RT @IDSAInfo see Tweet)

 


Thu, Apr 20 – Top 10 Medical News Stories!

20 Apr, 2017 | 00:01h | UTC

 

1 – Changes in prices, sales, consumer spending, and beverage consumption one year after a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages in Berkeley, California, US: A before-and-after study – PLOS One (free)

Sources: First US sugar tax sees soft drink sales fall by almost 10%, study shows – The Guardian (free) (RT @kamleshkhunti see Tweet) AND Sugary Drink Sales Fizzled After Soda Tax – MedPage Today (free registration required)

Related articles and commentaries on the possible benefits of sugar taxes: W.H.O. Urges Tax on Sugary Drinks to Fight Obesity – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free) Fiscal policies for diet and the prevention of noncommunicable diseases – World Health Organization (free) AND Mexico’s sugar tax leads to fall in consumption for second year running – The Guardian (free) AND Why the government should tax unhealthy foods and subsidise nutritious ones – The Conversation (free)

 

2 – Updated Guideline: Alcohol-use disorders: diagnosis and management of physical complications – National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE – UK) (free)

 

3 – Updated Guideline: Irritable bowel syndrome in adults: diagnosis and management – National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE – UK) (free)

 

4 – Cost-effectiveness of Common Diagnostic Approaches for Evaluation of Asymptomatic Microscopic Hematuria – JAMA Internal Medicine (free)

Invited commentary: Asymptomatic Microscopic Hematuria – Rethinking the Diagnostic Algorithm (free)

Routine urinalysis for screening is not presently recommended by any major health organization, but asymptomatic microscopic hematuria is a common incidental finding. This study suggests that the combination of renal ultrasound and cystoscopy is the most cost-effective approach for the evaluation of these patients.

 

5 – β-Blocker Exposure in Pregnancy and Risk of Fetal Cardiac Anomalies – JAMA Internal Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

See also: No Fetal Heart Risk from Mom’s Beta-Blocker Use – MedPage Today (free registration required)

 

6 – Syncope and Its Impact on Occupational Accidents and Employment: A Danish Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study – Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes (free)

News release: Fainting spells may increase risk of workplace accidents, job loss – American Heart Association News (free)

See also: 2017 ACC/AHA/HRS Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of Patients With Syncope (free PDF) AND First fainting guidelines issued to diagnose life-threatening heart conditions – American Heart Association News (free)

 

7 – Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases: low value interventions – The Medical Journal of Australia (free) (RT @ChooseWiselyAU and @ASIDANZ see Tweet)

See also: Choosing Wisely initiative was launched 5 years ago in our April 5 issue.

The society has just released a selection of 5 low value interventions (details in the text):

 

– Prescribing antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria.

– Taking a swab of a leg ulcer without signs of clinical infection and treating the patient with antibiotics against the identified bacteria.

– Treating upper respiratory tract infections with antibiotics.

– Investigation for fecal pathogens in the absence of diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms.

– Ordering multiple serological investigations for patients with fatigue without a clinical indication or relevant epidemiology.

 

8 – Use of Medications of Questionable Benefit at the End of Life in Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia – Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

See also: Use of Medications of Questionable Benefit at the End of Life in Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia – CBCNews (free) AND Many With Advanced Dementia Receiving Drugs of Uncertain Benefit – Medscape (free registration required)

“Too much use of meds of questionable benefit at the end of life: Just Stop.” (RT @DeeMangin see Tweet)

 

9 – Should You Take an Anticoagulant for AF? — Applying the 4 questions – Dr John M Blog (free) (@drjohnm see Tweet)

See also: anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation decision aid endorsed by NICE – National Institute for Health Care Excellence (UK) (free)

Very interesting post about how to practice shared decision making in patients with atrial fibrillation.

 

10 – Mortality Trends After a Voluntary Checklist-based Surgical Safety Collaborative – Annals of Surgery (link to abstract – free PDF available)

Sources: Global Health NOW Newsletter (free) AND South Carolina Hospitals Saw Surgery Deaths Drop After Implementing WHO Checklist – AJMC News (free) AND A simple checklist prevents deaths after surgery, a large new study suggests – The Washington Post (a few articles per month are free)

See also: WHO Surgical Safety Checklist – World Health Organization (free) AND A Surgical Safety Checklist to Reduce Morbidity and Mortality in a Global Population – New England Journal of Medicine (free)

 


Preventing Sports Injury and Illness: Key Resources for Family Physicians

19 Apr, 2017 | 14:18h | UTC

Preventing Sports Injury and Illness: Key Resources for Family Physicians – American Family Physician (free)

Selection of resources for primary care providers to improve their ability to prevent and treat injuries from sports and physical activity.

 


Irritable bowel syndrome in adults: diagnosis and management

20 Apr, 2017 | 14:26h | UTC

Updated Guideline: Irritable bowel syndrome in adults: diagnosis and management – National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE – UK) (free)

 


The 2017 Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals

19 Apr, 2017 | 14:19h | UTC

The 2017 Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals: a new visual guide to data and development – The World Bank (free) (RT @glassmanamandaand @St_Klingebiel see Tweet)

With over 150 maps and data visualizations, the new publication charts the progress societies are making towards the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals.

 


Beverage consumption taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages

20 Apr, 2017 | 14:22h | UTC

Changes in prices, sales, consumer spending, and beverage consumption one year after a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages in Berkeley, California, US: A before-and-after study – PLOS One (free)

Sources: First US sugar tax sees soft drink sales fall by almost 10%, study shows – The Guardian (free) (RT @kamleshkhunti see Tweet) AND Sugary Drink Sales Fizzled After Soda Tax – MedPage Today (free registration required)

Related articles and commentaries on the possible benefits of sugar taxes: W.H.O. Urges Tax on Sugary Drinks to Fight Obesity – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free) Fiscal policies for diet and the prevention of noncommunicable diseases – World Health Organization(free) AND Mexico’s sugar tax leads to fall in consumption for second year running – The Guardian (free) AND Why the government should tax unhealthy foods and subsidise nutritious ones – The Conversation (free)

 


Alcohol-use disorders: diagnosis and management of physical complications

20 Apr, 2017 | 14:25h | UTC

Updated Guideline: Alcohol-use disorders: diagnosis and management of physical complications – National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE – UK) (free)

 


Associations of Maternal Antidepressant Use and Complications in Offspring

19 Apr, 2017 | 14:12h | UTC

Associations of Maternal Antidepressant Use During the First Trimester of Pregnancy With Preterm Birth, Small for Gestational Age, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Offspring – JAMA (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Contradicting a previous study showing increased risk of autism with antidepressant use during pregnancy (free), this large retrospect cohort study of 1 580 629 Swedish offspring did not show an association of antidepressant use during pregnancy and autism or other neurodevelopment problems.

 


Maternal asthma: Management strategies

19 Apr, 2017 | 14:16h | UTC

Maternal asthma: Management strategies – Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine (free)

 


Dexamethasone versus for postoperative nausea and vomiting in GI surgery

19 Apr, 2017 | 14:15h | UTC

Dexamethasone versus standard treatment for postoperative nausea and vomiting in gastrointestinal surgery: randomised controlled trial (DREAMS Trial) – The BMJ (free)

A single dose of 8 mg intravenous dexamethasone at induction of anesthesia reduced postoperative nausea and vomiting with no increase in adverse events.

 


Wed, Apr 19 – Top 10 Medical News Stories!

19 Apr, 2017 | 00:01h | UTC

 

1 – Integrating neglected tropical diseases in global health and development: Fourth WHO report on neglected tropical diseases (free)

Press release: Unprecedented progress against neglected tropical diseases, WHO reports (free)

See also: Executive summary (free) AND Neglected No More – Gates Notes (free) AND The world’s assault on tropical diseases is working – STAT News (free)

 

2 – A guide to neglected tropical diseases prioritised by the World Health Organisation – Financial Times (free) (RT @NTDCOUNTDOWN See Tweet)

See also: Fact sheets relating to NTD – World Health Organization (free)

“The World Health Organisation has selected 18 as good candidates to be controlled”

 

3 – Rapid Rule-out of Acute Myocardial Infarction with a Single High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T Measurement Below the Limit of Detection: A Collaborative Meta-analysis – Annals of Internal Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

See also: High-Sensitivity Troponin T Test Rules Out AMI in ED – Medscape (free registration required) AND Meta-Analysis: Single Cardiac Troponin Test Plus ECG Can Quickly Rule Out MI – Physician’s First Watch (free)

“This analysis indicates that a nonischemic ECG and a single negative High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T only misses about 1 in 100 myocardial infarctions – and can provide rapid, useful information in an assessment.” (from Physician’s First Watch commentary above).

 

4 – Comparison of Recommended Eligibility for Primary Prevention Statin Therapy Based on the US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendations vs the ACC/AHA Guidelines – JAMA (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

See also: ACC/AHA vs. USPSTF statin guidelines – Cardiology News (free)

Although recommended by most guidelines for individuals at high risk, there is still some controversy over prescribing statins for primary prevention and over what patients benefit the most – see related commentary: Cholesterol-lowering statin therapy for healthy people is not as simple as ‘yes’ or ‘no’ – The Pharmaceutical Journal (free)

Adherence to the 2016 USPSTF recommendations for statin therapy, compared with the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines, could lead to a lower number of individuals (an estimated difference of 9.3 million individuals in the U.S. population) recommended for primary prevention statin therapy.

 

5 – Associations of Maternal Antidepressant Use During the First Trimester of Pregnancy With Preterm Birth, Small for Gestational Age, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Offspring – JAMA (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Contradicting a previous study showing increased risk of autism with antidepressant use during pregnancy (free), this large retrospect cohort study of 1 580 629 Swedish offspring did not show an association of antidepressant use during pregnancy and autism or other neurodevelopment problems.

 

6 – Dexamethasone versus standard treatment for postoperative nausea and vomiting in gastrointestinal surgery: randomised controlled trial (DREAMS Trial) – The BMJ (free)

A single dose of 8 mg intravenous dexamethasone at induction of anesthesia reduced postoperative nausea and vomiting with no increase in adverse events.

 

7 – Maternal asthma: Management strategies – Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine (free)

 

8 – Why it’s a bad idea to space out your child’s vaccination shots – The Washington Post (a few articles per month are free)

“Splitting immunizations into several visits only increases children’s stress” (RT @IDSAInfo see Tweet)

 

9 – The 2017 Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals: a new visual guide to data and development – The World Bank (free) (RT @glassmanamanda and @St_Klingebiel see Tweet)

With over 150 maps and data visualizations, the new publication charts the progress societies are making towards the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals.

 

10 – Preventing Sports Injury and Illness: Key Resources for Family Physicians – American Family Physician (free)

Selection of resources for primary care providers to improve their ability to prevent and treat injuries from sports and physical activity.

 


Integrating neglected tropical diseases in global health and development

19 Apr, 2017 | 14:08h | UTC

Integrating neglected tropical diseases in global health and development: Fourth WHO report on neglected tropical diseases (free)

Press release: Unprecedented progress against neglected tropical diseases, WHO reports (free)

See also: Executive summary (free) AND Neglected No More – Gates Notes (free) AND The world’s assault on tropical diseases is working – STAT News (free)

 

A guide to neglected tropical diseases prioritised by the World Health Organisation – Financial Times (free) (RT @NTDCOUNTDOWN See Tweet)

See also: Fact sheets relating to NTD – World Health Organization (free)

“The World Health Organisation has selected 18 as good candidates to be controlled”

 


Single Cardiac Troponin Test Plus ECG Can Quickly Rule Out MI

19 Apr, 2017 | 14:10h | UTC

Rapid Rule-out of Acute Myocardial Infarction with a Single High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T Measurement Below the Limit of Detection: A Collaborative Meta-analysis – Annals of Internal Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

See also: High-Sensitivity Troponin T Test Rules Out AMI in ED – Medscape (free registration required) AND Meta-Analysis: Single Cardiac Troponin Test Plus ECG Can Quickly Rule Out MI – Physician’s First Watch (free)

“This analysis indicates that a nonischemic ECG and a single negative High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T only misses about 1 in 100 myocardial infarctions – and can provide rapid, useful information in an assessment.” (from Physician’s First Watch commentary above).

 


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